Month: January 2016

Marbling on Fabric

This week at college we had a go at marbling on fabric. This blog explains the process in detail http://buggyandbuddy.com/marble-fabric/ We were given cotton and silk samples which had been pre-treated with Alum. This is so that the marbling remains if the fabric comes into contact with water. For the actual marbling, we used Marabu marble paint. We had a bowl of water. We let droplets of paint fall onto the water (they stay on the surface as they are oil based), and then created patterns in the paint using combs and sticks. Finally, the fabric is placed on top of the paint, and the paint adheres to the fabric.

Here are the samples I created. The first was silk and the second, cotton. I’m not particularly pleased with my samples – I didn’t like the paint colours available or the patterns that came out. With the cotton sample, I accidentally had two pieces of fabric but didn’t realize until I went to lift it out of the water, and consequently dragged the fabric in the water.  I wanted to share the experience anyway as it is part of the artistic journey and the technique may be of interest to someone. The samples on the linked blog above are a lot better than mine!

fabric_marbling_2

fabric_marbling_1

 

© northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey, 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Advertisements

Machine Embroidered Lace Designs

In college this week we learned how to create machine embroidered lace designs. A water-soluble plastic film is used as a stabiliser. The basic technique is to stitch onto your fabric and the plastic film, and then rinse your work in warm water which dissolves the film, leaving your embroidery. The technique can be used inside your fabric, on the edge of your fabric, or you can simply stitch into the plastic film. Here is an example I made using my home sewing machine.

I used calico as the fabric. This was placed into an embroidery hoop with the plastic film also in the hoop underneath the fabric. I then drew a shape onto the fabric and sewed round the edge in a running stitch 3 times.

water_soluble_1

The next stage is to cut out the middle of the shape, cutting the fabric but not the water-soluble plastic underneath. Then zigzag stitch around the edge of the shape to make it more secure.

water_soluble_2

Now you can sew whatever you like over the hole. The one thing to remember is to sew so that the design in the middle is attached to the edge of the fabric, otherwise it will fall apart when the water-soluble plastic is melted. On some machines the plastic doesn’t move around freely and so you may need to place something else underneath. At college we were given dark blue kitchen paper which gets tangled in your work and makes a mess. At home I used baking paper and this was easier to remove afterwards.

water_soluble_3

The final step is to rinse the design in warm water to dissolve the plastic.

water_soluble_4

Here is the sample I made at college. I had one of the rubbish machines which didn’t have an embroidery foot, hence the masses of pink thread. I added silver thread on top on my home machine.

water_soluble_5

Here is another sample I created at home.

water_soluble_6

Finally, I decided to try creating a design at the edge of the fabric. The technique is the same, only there is no fabric to cut out this time.

water_soluble_7

 

 

© northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey, 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Beginning Machine Embroidery

After much frustration I have finally got my sewing machine to do free-hand embroidery without puckering or catching underneath. I’m using a standard sewing machine, not an embroidery machine, brand Janome, and one which is towards the lower end of the market. I’m no technical expert but wanted to share my experience here in case it helps anyone else.

In order to do free-hand embroidery on a normal sewing machine you need two things. The first is to remove the dog feed teeth which normally move your fabric along. Some sewing machines come with a lever which will drop the teeth. Otherwise, you need to put a darning plate over the top of the teeth.

The second thing you need is an embroidery/quilting foot. Machine instructions often claim that you can do free-hand embroidery by dropping the dog teeth and sewing with no foot attached, however I have found machines continually pucker underneath when there is no embroidery foot attached. What is different about an embroidery foot compared to a normal foot is that it is spring loaded and will vary it’s height according to the fabric being sewn onto.  This is my machine. There are different designs of embroidery foot available. The one pictured is metal and closed foot. For other models and brands you can get a foot which is open-toed and/or has a clear plastic toe. These are preferable as you can see what you are doing better.

Once you get to machine embroidery there are different types of thread to consider. There is normal machine sewing thread and machine embroidery thread. You are probably best looking at another resource for the types of threads and thread weights. My textile art course tutor has advised us to use good quality machine embroidery thread as it creates a better finish – brands Madeira and Gutermann are recommended. These are more expensive but I think worth it.

This is a sampler I have created on my machine with a cheap thread whilst getting used to free-hand embroidery. The fabric is calico. Whilst sewing, the fabric is placed in an embroidery hoop to keep it taut.

mahcine_embroidery_sampler

I have purchased a box of Madeira threads and will be using them for future work. My textile art course has resumed and I will have some interesting stuff to share from that over the next few weeks. I’m also keen to try using machine embroidery to create more personal and emotional artistic expressions.

 

© northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey, 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Unicorn Suncatcher

I started out with a white silk sun catcher. The original plan was to create a peaceful picture of a tree. I first used silk paints to create the background. I applied the green and blue paint, and then put salt on to create the effects. Larger granules were used for the middle section of the sky, smaller granules for the edges of the sky and the grass.

I thought the sky had a mystical feel to it and would be wasted on a tree, and so I changed the design to picture a unicorn instead.

The water marks weren’t part of the plan and I decided they needed to be covered up. I used two tones of felt wool to create bushes to cover up the water marks. These were attached to the sun catcher using Bondaweb.

unicorn_suncatcher_part2

I decided to sew over the top of the bushes to add interest. I then created the unicorn from felt, attached it using Bondaweb, and machine sewed the lines on the unicorn.

unicorn suncatcher part3

I decided I didn’t like the machine stitching on the buses so removed it. I instead hand sewed a few beads onto the buses to add interest as well as to better secure the felt wool to the sun catcher. Then the final details were added using a mixture of hand and machine sewing.

Unicorn_suncatcher _small

 

 

 

© northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey, 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Shackled

 

I live some aspects of my life according to unhelpful messages from my parents and my anxieties, rather than as nature and free spirit intended. I am increasingly aware of these things and their impact upon me. I created this image to express the sense of being constrained and shackled. The image makes me feel angry and sad.

© northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey, 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to northernrose17 and A Therapeutic Art Journey with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.